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Seed and nut bar

Seed and nut bar
Snacks

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SERVES:
20
DIFFICULTY:
Easy
PREP TIME:
15 minutes
COOK TIME:
20 minutes

Ingredients

  • 2 cups Unsalted raw nuts, such as almonds, macadamia nuts and walnuts
  • 1/2 cup Sunflower seeds
  • 1/2 cup Pepitas (pumpkin seeds)
  • 2 tbsp Chia seeds
  • 2 tbsp Sesame seeds
  • 2 tsp Ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 cup Honey
  • 2 tbsp Macadamia oil
  • 2 tsp Natural vanilla extract
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Method

  • Preheat the oven to 150°C (300°F). Line a 23 x 33 cm (9 x 13 inch) baking tray with baking paper.
  • Roughly chop the nuts, sunflower seeds and pepitas together in a food processor. Transfer to a large bowl and stir in the chia, sesame seeds and cinnamon.
  • Stir the honey, oil and vanilla in a small saucepan over low heat until well combined. Pour over the dry ingredients and stir well.
  • Wet your hands and press the mixture firmly onto the tray. Press with the back of a spoon to smooth the surface. Bake for 20 minutes or until deep golden brown. Cool completely on the tray, then refrigerate until chilled. Cut into bars or squares. These will keep for up to 2 weeks in an airtight container in the fridge.

Notes

Nuts are very satisfying, but also extremely energy dense, so portion size is the key. For a vegan version, replace the honey with rice malt syrup.
Energy per serve: 804kJ
Chrissy Freer’s new book, Real Delicious, follows on from her popular Supergrains and Superlegumes (all published by Murdoch Books).

 

Please note the serving size listed is to be used as a guide only. Consider your own individual nutrient and carbohydrate requirements and adjust the serving size as required. If you are unsure of your requirements consult an Accredited Practising Dietitian (APD) for personalises advice.


Nutritional information (per serve)

Calories: 192kcal | Carbohydrates: 9g | Protein: 5g | Fat: 15g | Sodium: 3mg | Fiber: 2g
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