GI News—December 2013

Give prime position on the buffet table to healthy dishes;  Does replacing sugar with isomaltulose improve BGLs? Lower BGLs, better memory;   Prof Jennie Brand-Miller on getting kids to like good foods; Dr Alan Barclay on festive drinks;    Nicole Senior enjoys deliciously low GI dates; For festive fare try: Spiced date, nut and pomegranate loaf; […]

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Food for Thought

Health-by-design at the festive table The holiday season is rapidly approaching and chief cooks in households around the world are starting to think about what festive fare to serve family and friends (of course the better organised ones have already made the Christmas puddings, mince pies and cakes). Serving the special foods that are part […]

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News and Reviews

Low GI diet in pregnancy reduces risk of excess weight gain Researchers in Ireland have found that giving women advice on a healthy low GI diet early in pregnancy can reduce the risk of excess weight gain and improve nutrition. Compared to women who received usual maternal care, those who were educated on a low GI […]

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Nicole’s Taste of Health

It’s a date!A friend brought along fresh dates to snack on the other evening and said they were as good as chocolate – high praise indeed. They were fabulous and had come all the way from California; my friend believes they grow the best she’s found. Food miles aside, I had to agree with her. […]

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In the GI News Kitchen

Family Baking, Anneka Manning, author of Bake Eat Love. Learn to Bake in 3 Simple Steps and founder of Sydney’s BakeClub, shares her delicious ‘better-for-you’ recipes for snacks, desserts and treats the whole family will love. Through both her writing and cooking school, Anneka teaches home cooks to bake in practical and approachable yet inspiring […]

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We Are What We Ate

The New World bird that took over the Old World table Christmas – our biggest annual celebration – may seem like an age-old tradition, but travel back in time, and you will find it was typically a modest event for most people and, at times, a non event. England’s Puritan government cancelled Christmas in 1647, forbidding […]

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GI Symbol News with Dr Alan Barclay

Dr Alan Barclay Cheers Festive occasions tend to involve feasting. And when we eat, we tend to have something to drink. But apart from water, drinks usually come with calories. Research shows that on average, overweight adults in the US pack on and extra 5 pounds (2.3 kg) over the six-week Thanksgiving–New Year period. But the […]

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GI Update with Prof Jennie Brand-Miller

Prof Jennie Brand-Miller answers your questions.  I watch my sister struggling to get her almost 3-year-old son to eat fruits and vegetable, or any healthy food really. I am just about to introduce my baby to solids. I don’t want to go through what she is dealing with. Have you any tips to help me? Children […]

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GI News—November 2013

David Katz: ‘Demonizing saturated fat never helped us much. Canonizing it now won’t help us any either’;  Is the origin of type 1 diabetes in the gut? Prof Jennie Brand-Miller on reducing the risk of type 2 diabetes;   Dr Alan Barclay on the new American Diabetes Association guidelines for adults with diabetes;    Nicole Senior […]

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Food for Thought

What’s for dinner?  Food, choice and serving something delicious for dinner every night, is something many of us take for granted. Foodbank’s 2013 End Hunger Report is a timely reminder that a growing number of families are not so fortunate and have to turn to food relief to put something on the table. ‘Hunger in […]

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In the News

Scapegoats, saints, and saturated fats: old mistakes in new directions. A recent commentary piece in the British Medical Journal suggests that saturated fat is not really so bad after all. Is the author right? Is it time to absolve saturated fat? Not at all says Dr David Katz pointing out that it was never time to […]

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Nicole’s Taste of Health

Say Cheese!  It’s no wonder ‘cheese’ is the word most often used to make us smile for photographs: even the thought of it makes us happy. The story of cheese as a preservation method for milk through to artisanal masterpieces and myriad types, flavours, textures and culinary uses today, is a fascinating one. The favoured […]

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In the GI News Kitchen

Family Baking, Anneka Manning, author of Bake Eat Love. Learn to Bake in 3 Simple Steps and founder of Sydney’s BakeClub, shares her delicious ‘better-for-you’ recipes for snacks, desserts and treats the whole family will love. Through both her writing and cooking school, Anneka teaches home cooks to bake in practical and approachable yet inspiring […]

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We Are What We Ate

Trading cheese has a long tradition In her ‘Say Cheese’ piece in this issue, Nicole Senior reminds us of the pleasure of a good piece of cheese. It’s certainly a food that’s long had value and currency for consumers as the following extracts will show. First, here’s what Daniel Defoe wrote about cheese in his Tour […]

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GI Symbol News with Dr Alan Barclay

Dr Alan Barclay New American Diabetes Association (ADA) nutrition guidelines for adults with diabetes.  The ADA has published its latest edition of the Nutrition Therapy Recommendations for the Management of Adults With Diabetes, the first major update in 5 years. Perhaps unsurprisingly, they are evolutionary rather than revolutionary. One of the more important aspects of […]

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GI Update with Prof Jennie Brand-Miller

Prof Jennie Brand-Miller answers your questions.  I know that type 2 diabetes is one of the fastest growing chronic diseases worldwide. Do we know why this is so and what people like me (it runs in my family) can do to prevent getting it?  The global increase in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes is […]

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GI News—October 2013

 Sleep and diabetes risk;  Is insulin response more important than the GI value? Tomato Magic with Nicole Senior;   Four recipes including Wonton asparagus soup and Anneka’s Baked eggs in nests with tomato and spinach;   The difference in being rich or poor in gut bacteria;   Dr David Katz new book: Disease Proof;    China’s diabetes […]

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Food for Thought

Sugar, diabetes and why the state of our health is not about any one thing.  Many of the nutrition studies we share with GI News readers are prospective studies. Looking at large groups of people over a period of time (usually many years), the researchers mine the data (rather like gold prospectors) looking for links […]

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What’s New?

Dementia risk and BGLs.  Blood sugar levels averaged over a five-year period were associated with rising risks for developing dementia, according to the findings of a recent study published in the New England Journal of Medicine. For example: In people without diabetes, risk for dementia was 18% higher for people with an average glucose level […]

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Nicole’s Taste of Health

Tomato magic. ‘Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in fruit salad.’ This is one of my favourite quotable quotes and refers to one of the many botanical versus culinary inconsistencies in the world of food. Olives and avocadoes are the other obvious examples of fruits that we usually eat […]

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In the GI News Kitchen

Family Baking, Anneka Manning, author of Bake Eat Love. Learn to Bake in 3 Simple Steps and founder of Sydney’s BakeClub, shares her delicious ‘better-for-you’ recipes for snacks, desserts and treats the whole family will love. Through both her writing and cooking school, Anneka teaches home cooks to bake in practical and approachable yet inspiring […]

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We Are What We Ate

The evolution of dietary recommendations for diabetes.   They knew about diabetes in ancient Egypt. Physician Hesy-Ra of the 3rd Dynasty describes various diseases including a polyuric syndrome, presumably diabetes, in what is now known as the Ebers papyrus (1500BCE). Ancient Ayurvedic texts from India go further describing two types of diabetes-like conditions – congenital and […]

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GI Symbol News with Dr Alan Barclay

Dr Alan BarclayDiabetes and pre-diabetes epidemic in China.   China is now the global epicentre of diabetes and pre-diabetes according to new research in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Nearly two out of three Chinese adults has diabetes or prediabetes. In 2010, a survey of Chinese adults found that 11.6%, equivalent to a […]

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GI Update with Prof Jennie Brand-Miller

Prof Jennie Brand-Miller answers your questions.  Isn’t the insulin response more important than the GI value? Wouldn’t it be better to have an insulin index of foods? The insulin demand exerted by foods is indeed important for long-term health, but it doesn’t necessarily follow that we need an insulin index of foods instead of a glycemic […]

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French Toast with Mixed Berries

Preparation time: 15 minutes Cooking time: 6 minutes Serves: 2             Ingredients: 2 slices Bürgen® Wholegrains and Oats Bread 100g mixed berries (fresh or frozen) 1 egg ½ cup reduced fat milk Optional : 1 tbsp maple syrup or honey 50g low fat natural yogurt Sprinkle with LSA* Mix (Linseed, […]

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Food for Thought

Should you be eating that, it’s full of sugar?  Last month one of our readers (a self confessed, long-time follower of the Montignac diet) was outraged that we had published a recipe that included sugar (by which she specifically means sucrose). Montignac does use sugar in his recipes – his sugar of choice is fructose […]

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GI News—September 2013

Why cheese doesn’t have a GI value;  Nicole Senior checks out almonds – that great all rounder;   Make the most of almonds with recipes from Michael Moore and Anneka Manning;   Obesity and diabetes: the gene factor;  Obesity and diabetes on the up, downunder;   New GI values for Yoplait Petit Miam.   GI News Editor: Philippa […]

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What’s New?

Obesity and diabetes: The gene factor.  Using careful definitions and measurements of body fatness, Professor Lesley Campbell and Dr Arthur Jenkins have shown that obesity that runs in families of people with type 2 diabetes is due to a large number of rare variants in many different genes. Their study was published in PLOS ONE. […]

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Nicole’s Taste of Health

Almond amore.   I love almonds (and nuts in general actually) but I’m not the only one as these crunchy little numbers have been a delicacy throughout history. They originated in China before spreading throughout Europe. And speaking of loving almonds, the ancient Romans would give newlyweds almonds as a fertility charm. Even now sugar-coated […]

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In the GI News Kitchen

Here’s how you can cut back on the food bills and enjoy fresh, easily, seasonal, satisfying and delicious low or moderate GI meals that don’t compromise on quality and flavour one little bit with our Money Saving Meals including chef Michael Moore’s Chilled apple, pear & quinoa porridge with raw almonds from Blood Sugar: the […]

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We Are What We Ate

Say cheese, but when?  The processing of milk and particularly the production of cheese were critical in early agricultural societies as it allowed the preservation of milk in a non-perishable and transportable form and, of primary importance, it made milk a more digestible commodity for early prehistoric farmers. However, while we do know a fair […]

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GI Symbol News with Dr Alan Barclay

Dr Alan Barclay Overweight, obesity and diabetes are on the up downunder.  The latest results from Australia’s largest population health study, AusDiab, show that rates of diabetes continue to increase around the nation. When AusDiab began in 1999–2000, 8.5% of the adult population 25 and over had diabetes; in 2011–12 that number had increased to […]

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GI Update with Prof Jennie Brand-Miller

Prof Jennie Brand-Miller answers your questions.  Why doesn’t cheese have a GI value? Other dairy foods like milk and yoghurt and even ice cream do.  The glycemic index (GI) is a ranking of carbohydrates on a scale from 0 to 100 according to the extent to which they raise blood glucose levels after eating. Only […]

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GI News—August 2013

The real deal on agave syrup, coconut sugar and rice syrup;  Nicole Senior checks out crispy, crunchy carrots in Taste of Health;  Anneka Manning shares her amazing carrot cake recipe in Family Baking;  Rice – enjoy it but keep portions moderate and look for lower GI varieties says Dr Alan Barclay;  New SunRice Low GI […]

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Food for Thought

Sweet celebrities.  Chrissy Freer, author of the delicious Supergrains, recently quizzed us about rice syrup as magazine editors keep asking her to use it in recipes for ‘healthy’ baking. ‘Is it actually a ‘healthier’ alternative to sugar or just another fashionable sweetener being touted as sugar free and better for you?’ she asked. Rice syrup […]

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What’s New?

Diet soft drinks – is it the drink or what you eat with it that’s the problem?  An opinion article published by Cell Press in Trends in Endocrinology & Metabolism reviews evidence on the negative impact of artificial sweeteners on health, raising red flags about all sweeteners – even those that don’t have any calories. […]

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Nicole’s Taste of Health

Carrot tops.  We’ve just planted some winter veg and the crop I’m most looking forward to harvesting is the Dutch carrots. Even though we usually buy carrots nude from the supermarket, I confess I love the look of the green tops – and they’re a great indicator of freshness. And they make harvesting fun too: […]

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In the GI News Kitchen

Family Baking, Anneka Manning, author of Bake Eat Love. Learn to Bake in 3 Simple Steps and founder of Sydney’s BakeClub, shares her delicious ‘better-for-you’ recipes for snacks, desserts and treats the whole family will love. Through both her writing and cooking school, Anneka teaches home cooks to bake in practical and approachable yet inspiring […]

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We Are What We Ate

A-foraging we will go. Foraging is back in fashion. Danish chef Rene Redzepi’s passion for foraging and using native ingredients put Noma on the map and triggered a small culinary revolution. Most ‘urban foraging’ is for extras not survival – it’s for flavour foods like herbs and greens or seasonal fare like mushrooms or picking […]

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GI Symbol News with Dr Alan Barclay

Dr Alan BarclayRice – enjoy it, but don’t overdo it and opt for lower GI varietiesThe Chinese were the first to cultivate rice more than 8000 years ago, and over the millenia, it has spread all around the world. It is such a success story as a crop that today it is considered to be […]

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GI Update with Prof Jennie Brand-Miller

Prof Jennie Brand-Miller answers your questions.  I don’t understand how you can bake sweet foods like cakes or desserts that don’t have sugar in them (I’m not talking about artificial sweeteners here). What makes them sweet? Can you explain?  I can see why it is a confused and confusing area. We have to go back […]

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GI News—July 2013

Our clockwork body – why when we eat matters for our health;  New low GI gluten-free foods on supermarket shelves;  Going bananas for good health;   Better-for-you family baking: Banana Bread and flourless Applesauce Oat Bran Muffins with Pinoli;   Understanding the difference between GI, GL and glycemic response;   The real health benefits of […]

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Food for Thought

Baking boom.  Home baking is on the rise as many people rediscover the joy of baking better-for-you desserts and snacks packed with wholesome ingredients you can ‘picture in their raw state or growing in nature’ (Michael Pollan’s Food Rule Number 14) along with the pleasure that a home-baked cake, muffin or cookie brings family and […]

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What’s New?

Consensus on real health benefits of low GI/GL diets.  After reviewing all the latest research on glycemic index, glycemic load and glycemic response, an international committee of leading nutrition scientists have released a Scientific Consensus Statement that concludes that carbohydrate quality (GI) matters and that the carbohydrates present in different foods affect post-meal blood glucose […]

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Nicole’s Taste of Health

Going bananas!  Ever wondered where this came from? According to Wiki, we can trace it back to monkeys becoming somewhat intoxicated after feasting on fermented bananas that had fallen onto the forest floor and going crazy … You could call it a natural banana daiquiri! But, it’s not just monkeys who love bananas, fermented or […]

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In the GI News Kitchen

Family Baking, Anneka Manning, author of The Low GI Family Cookbook (Hachette) and founder of Sydney’s BakeClub, shares her delicious ‘better-for-you’ recipes for snacks, desserts and treats the whole family will love. Anneka creates accessible recipes that really work. Through both her writing and cooking school, she teaches home cooks to bake in practical and […]

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We Are What We Ate

The clockwork body – why when we eat matters.  ‘Body clocks are ancient mechanisms that regulate fundamental biological systems important to health, such as insulin secretion, the time we go to bed, the time we get up and the time we get hungry,’ says Dr Joe Bass, associate professor of medicine at Feinberg School of […]

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GI Symbol News with Dr Alan Barclay

Dr Alan BarclayLow GI, gluten-free foods.  Coeliac disease is becoming increasingly common, affecting around 1 in 100 people in Australia and the UK, and 1 in 133 Americans. People with coeliac disease’ own immune system reacts abnormally to the protein gluten found in wheat, rye, and barley (and often a contaminant in oats, depending on […]

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GI Update with Prof Jennie Brand-Miller

Prof Jennie Brand-Miller answers your questions.  Can you explain the difference between glycemic index, glycemic load and glycemic response? Glycemic Index (GI) is a measure of the quality of carbohydrate. It compares carbohydrates, gram for gram, in one food versus another. Different carbohydrate foods can behave quite differently in your body. Some break down quickly during […]

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GI News—June 2013

Bread: ‘ingenious technology for improving the flavour, digestibility and nutritional value of grass’ – Michael Pollan;  Paleolithic bread: looks like we have had our nose to the grindstone for about 30,000 years; Why white veggies are so good;   Prof Jennie Brand-Miller: why we don’t estimate the GI of our recipes;   Nicole Senior: baby’s […]

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Food for Thought

Staff of life.   Did you know that the Middle English word ‘companion’ (from Old French compaignon), literally means ‘one who breaks bread with another’, based on Latin com– ‘together with’ + panis ‘bread’. It is a gentle reminder in these ‘nutritionist’ times that no food is more basic, more essential and more universal, and […]

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What’s New?

The white stuff is the right stuff, too.  That rainbow of green, red and orange veggies tends to take prime position for top nutrient sources, but white vegetables (e.g. potatoes, cauliflower, turnips, onions, parsnips, mushrooms and kohlrabi) are nutrient powerhouses that have a place at the table too according to the authors of the Advances […]

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Nicole’s Taste of Health

Baby cakes. What we feed babies is important for their growth and development but we are finding out it is also important for the development of their future food habits. The food we offer is priming their tastebuds for later life. This idea was sensationally brought to the world’s attention when the results of study […]

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In the GI News Kitchen

American dietitian and author of Good Carbs, Bad Carbs, Johanna Burani, shares favourite recipes with a low or moderate GI from her Italian kitchen. For more information, check out Johanna’s website. The photographs are by Sergio Burani. His food, travel and wine photography website is photosbysergio.com. Strawberry yoghurt dessert.  Here is a simple, healthful dessert […]

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We Are What We Ate

Looks like we have had our nose to the grindstone for at least 30,000 years. Grinding starchy grains, tubers and rhizomes, possibly into flour, was a widespread practice across Europe 30,000 years ago according to Anna Revedin and colleagues’ findings in PNAS. The grinding stones they discovered at sites in Italy, Russia and the Czech […]

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GI Symbol News with Dr Alan Barclay

Dr Alan Barclay Give us this day our daily bread.  Taken literally, this line from the Lord’s Prayer (Matthew 6:9–13 and Luke 11:2–4) reminds us that bread has been a staple food for humankind for millenia. And still today it is consumed at breakfast, lunch and dinner time, and often for snacks in many parts […]

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GI Update with Prof Jennie Brand-Miller

Prof Jennie Brand-Miller answers your questions.  ‘How about giving us the GL of your recipes? Calories, fat, etc are all very interesting, but you’re supposed to be the “Glycemic Index Newsletter” and I find it frustrating that I have to go searching and calculating the GL of your recipes.’Most of us have great faith in […]

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GI News—May 2013

Why some of us can digest milk – and others can’t;   Milk and yoghurt: nutritious, inexpensive and low GI foods for the whole family;  As our waistlines have expanded, so have those of our pets;  Cuba: how an economic downturn led to a health upturn;   Low carb diets don’t help women with gestational diabetes;  The […]

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Food for Thought

Even our pets are fat … I took a sneak peak at our much loved and seriously plump puss some years ago when I read ‘even our pets are fat’ in the first chapter of Prof Jennie Brand-Miller’s original manuscript for The Low GI Diet. Today our much loved Silkie is a rather streamlined 6kg. We […]

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What’s New?

Canada’s new diabetes guidelines recommend low GI carbs.  The online release the Canadian Diabetes Association includes the full text of all 38 chapters and an appendix. Each chapter comes with a slide set and a brief video highlighting the key recommendations. There are also accompanying tools for health care providers and resources for patients. Here […]

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Get the Scoop

The scoop on potassium.Last year in GI News, dietitian Emma Stirling gave us the scoop on a study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition that investigated links between potassium levels and incidence of diabetes. That study found that as potassium levels went up, the incidence of diabetes went down. The African Americans in […]

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In the GI News Kitchen

American dietitian and author of Good Carbs, Bad Carbs, Johanna Burani, shares favourite recipes with a low or moderate GI from her Italian kitchen. For more information, check out Johanna’s website. The photographs are by Sergio Burani. His food, travel and wine photography website is photosbysergio.com. Sergio’s eggs ‘al tegamino’. My husband, Sergio, grew up […]

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We Are What We Ate

Milk – poster child for rapid evolution in humans.  Marlene Zuk, a professor of ecology, evolution, and behavior at the University of Minnesota, describes milk – or more accurately the ability to digest it – as ‘the poster child for rapid evolution in humans.’ In Paleofantasy she explains how this ability came about, what it means […]

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GI Symbol News with Dr Alan Barclay

Dr Alan BarclayMilk and yoghurt: nutritious and inexpensive low GI foods for the whole family.  Dairy foods like milk and yoghurt are great sources of essential nutrients like calcium, magnesium, zinc, vitamin A, riboflavin (B2), B12, protein and low GI carbs. Generally we recommend reduced or low fat varieties for most people over the age […]

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GI Update with Prof Jennie Brand-Miller

Prof Jennie Brand-Miller answers your questions.  What’s wrong with a low carb diet? Recent studies show that low carb diets can produce faster rates of weight loss than conventional low fat diets. The probable mechanism is lower day-long insulin levels – allowing greater use of fat as the source of fuel – the same mechanism underlying […]

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GI News—April 2013

Fats AND carbs count when it comes to your cholesterol;   Even our hunter-gatherer ancestors had clogged arteries;   What our teeth tell us about our diet;   Diet and acne – the latest;   The scoop on low GI bulgur;  Michael Moss’s New York Times bestseller Salt Sugar Fat — what’s missing;  Four great low GI […]

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Food for Thought

Would viewing food as ‘a cocktail of hormones’ deliver a better diet for weight loss and health?   The search for the perfect diet – one that promotes weight loss and optimal health – has left many people empty handed. In a Perspectives piece in Science, University of Cincinnati researchers, Prof Randy Seeley and Dr Karen […]

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What’s New?

Even our hunter-gatherer ancestors had clogged arteries.  In the last century, atherosclerotic vascular disease has replaced infectious disease as the leading cause of death (from heart attack and stroke) across the developed world. A new study in The Lancet, ‘Atherosclerosis across 4000 years of human history: the Horus study of four ancient populations’  reveals that […]

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Get the Scoop

The scoop on bulgur (GI 48).  Bulgur (also spelled bulgar, bulghur, burghul and bourghul) is a versatile, nutty-tasting, wholegrain cracked wheat that just may be one of our oldest processed foods. ‘Diners around 8000 years ago could enjoy a bowl of instant wheat cereal that wasn’t very different from hot wheat cereals served today according […]

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In the GI News Kitchen

American dietitian and author of Good Carbs, Bad Carbs, Johanna Burani, shares favourite recipes with a low or moderate GI from her Italian kitchen. For more information, check out Johanna’s website. The photographs are by Sergio Burani. His food, travel and wine photography website is photosbysergio.com. Pao’s asparagus soup.  This recipe is not Italian at […]

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We Are What We Ate

What our teeth tell us about our diet.  DNA from tartar (calcified dental plaque) on human teeth reveals the changes in our oral bacteria that accompanied the changes in our food supply over the past 7500 years. ‘Dental plaque represents the only easily accessible source of preserved human bacteria,’ says lead author Dr Christina Adler. […]

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GI Symbol News with Dr Alan Barclay

Dr Alan BarclayWhen it comes to blood cholesterol, both fats and carbohydrates count.  For many years, dietary advice to help people lower their blood cholesterol has focused on the fats in our diets. Specifically, people with high blood cholesterol have been advised to reduce their consumption of foods high in saturated and trans fats and […]

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GI Update with Prof Jennie Brand-Miller

Prof Jennie Brand-Miller answers your questions.  When I give talks, I am regularly asked if chronic disease such as heart disease, cancer, diabetes, stroke and arthritis an inevitable part of aging. It is good to be able to tell people that it’s not inevitable at all. It is possible to reduce your risk of the chronic […]

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GI News—March 2013

Jamie’s low GI 15-minute Falafel wraps/grilled veg & salsa;   Take that (glycemic) load off your diet and reduce your risk of type 2 diabetes;   Fat facts and fat fiction – the state of the evidence;  Was ancient man a vegetarian asks Dr Rob Dunn;  The Longevity Project;   The scoop on pearl couscous; […]

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Food for Thought

What’s irisin? Glenn Cardwell brings us up to speed on this interesting hormone.   Glenn Cardwell ‘Don’t you like to be the first person in your group to use a new word? Sitting at the dining table commenting: “Excuse me, you have a little bit of food on your philtrum”. Well now, rather than saying something […]

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What’s New?

Fat facts and fat fiction.   Dietary advice about fat is always controversial, and even experts disagree about what recommendations are supported by current evidence. Kevin Lomangino, editor of Clinical Nutrition Insight contributed to the recent US Consumer Reports piece (which was also extensively edited and reviewed by nutrition scientists). In a Guest Post on […]

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Get the Scoop

The scoop on pearl couscous.  Unlike traditional couscous, pearl couscous which takes its name from its pearl-like shape and size is often described as a ‘toasted pasta specialty’. Like regular pasta, it is made from hard (durum) wheat and water. But instead of being dried, it is toasted in an oven. It has a rich, […]

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In the GI News Kitchen

American dietitian and author of Good Carbs, Bad Carbs, Johanna Burani, shares favourite recipes with a low or moderate GI from her Italian kitchen. For more information, check out Johanna’s website. The photographs are by Sergio Burani. His food, travel and wine photography website is photosbysergio.com. Winter vegetable mix.  Leave it to the Italians to […]

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We Are What We Ate

Was ancient man a vegetarian? Robb Dunn reviews the evidence.  First published in Scientific American. This edited and updated extract reprinted with their kind permission. Rob Dunn ‘Right now, one half of all Americans are on a diet. The other half just gave up on their diets and are on a binge. Collectively, we are […]

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GI Symbol News with Dr Alan Barclay

Dr Alan Barclay Reduce that load and reduce your risk.  A-grade research (think Olympic gold level) from around the world over the past 20-plus years has shown pretty conclusively that type 2 diabetes is not caused by any single nutrient or food (such as sugar) but from a combination of diet and lifestyle risk factors. […]

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GI Update with Prof Jennie Brand-Miller

Prof Jennie Brand-Miller answers your questions.  I have never been much of a meat eater and have decided to go completely vegetarian. Can you give me some tips on making sure that I get all the nutrients I need.  Building your diet around plant foods such as wholegrains, legumes, fruits and vegetables, nuts and seeds […]

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GI News—February 2013

Jamie’s low GI 15-minute pesto spaghetti with lemon steamed fish;   Not all refined carbs are high GI;  Cooking food ups calorie counts;   Why iodine deficiency is such a big problem;   Cooking helped to make us human;  Why it’s time to redefine ‘wholegrains’.  With another series of MasterChef hitting screens, we thought we […]

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Food for Thought

Prof Richard Wrangham on why cooked food provides a lot more energy than eating the same food raw.  Photograph: Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard News Office ‘Whether we are talking about plants or meat, eating cooked food provides more calories than eating the same food raw. And that means that the calorie counts we’ve grown so used to […]

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What’s New?

Why ‘whole grain’ is not always healthy.  Current standards for classifying foods as ‘whole grain’ are inconsistent and, in some cases, misleading, according to a new study in Public Health Nutrition by Harvard School of Public Health researchers. One of the most widely used industry standards, the Whole Grain Stamp, actually identified grain products that […]

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Get the Scoop

The scoop on redefining wholegrains with Prof Jennie Brand-Miller.  ‘Consume more wholegrains is enshrined in dietary guidelines around the globe and has become something of a mantra by doctors, dietitians and nutritionists’ says Prof Jennie Brand-Miller. ‘But does the science stack up to scrutiny? When you see wholegrains on a pack, do you assume it’s […]

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In the GI News Kitchen

American dietitian and author of Good Carbs, Bad Carbs, Johanna Burani, shares favourite recipes with a low or moderate GI from her Italian kitchen. For more information, check out Johanna’s website. The photographs are by Sergio Burani. His food, travel and wine photography website is photosbysergio.com. Tiziana’s roasted peppers.   Tiziana is my amazing sister-in-law. […]

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We Are What We Ate

How cooking helped to make us human.  ‘You are what you eat.’ Can these pithy words explain the evolution of the human species? Yes, says Richard Wrangham of Harvard University, who argues in his book, Catching Fire, that the invention of cooking – even more than agriculture, the eating of meat, or the advent of […]

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GI Symbol News with Dr Alan Barclay

Dr Alan Barclay Not all refined carbs are high GI. Despite frequently being used interchangeably in the media and scientific reports ‘refined carbohydrate’ and ‘high GI’ are not the same thing. In fact using them as if they were may have adverse effects on some people’s health as some refined carb foods (like pasta) have […]

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GI Update with Prof Jennie Brand-Miller

Prof Jennie Brand-Miller answers your questions.  I read an article in the Sydney Morning Herald suggesting iodine deficiency could be why Australian children lag behind at school. Can you tell me more about iodine and how much we need and where we can get it naturally. Iodine is a naturally occurring mineral that is needed by […]

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Copyright and Permission

CopyrightThis website and all information, data, documents, pages and images it contains is copyright under the Copyright Act 1968 (Commonwealth of Australia) (as amended) and the copyright laws of all member countries of the Berne Union and the Universal Copyright Convention. Copyright in the website and in material prepared by GI News is owned by […]

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GI News—January 2013

Check out Jamie’s low GI 15-minute meal;   How honey helped to make us human;  The scoop on quinoa plus recipes to enjoy;   GI provisions in new health claims legislation for ANZ;    How low should a low GI diet go?  Why going meatless one day a week is a good idea.  Feet, forks, […]

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Food for Thought

Add years to your life and life to your years with Dr David Katz’s Super Six.  ‘Feet, forks, fingers, sleep, stress and love are the best medicine we have for preventing cancer and other chronic diseases, and all are good for health anyway,’ says Dr David Katz. Dr David Katz ‘Regular physical activity (feet) is […]

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What’s New?

Prof Jennie Brand-Miller on how low should a low GI diet go?  ‘The GI was introduced back in 1981 to rate the glycemic character of the carbohydrate in individual foods like bread, breakfast cereal, rice, pasta, apples etc.,’ says Prof Jennie Brand-Miller. ‘The purpose was to exchange one carbohydrate source with another for snacks and […]

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Get the Scoop

The scoop on quinoa.  The United Nations has declared that 2013 is International Year of Quinoa. It was extensively cultivated by pre-Columbian cultures from around 3000 BC, and along with corn and potatoes was a staple in Andean meals and referred to as the ‘mother grain’. During 2013, food security, agriculture, and nutrition experts want […]

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In the GI News Kitchen

American dietitian and author of Good Carbs, Bad Carbs, Johanna Burani, shares favourite recipes with a low or moderate GI from her Italian kitchen. For more information, check out Johanna’s website. The photographs are by Sergio Burani. His food, travel and wine photography website is photosbysergio.com. Spaghetti al gorgonzola.  This quick and easy pasta dish […]

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We Are What We Ate

Alyssa Crittenden: How honey helped to make us human….  Dr Alyssa Crittenden ‘Most discussions of the evolution of the human diet implicate meat as the proverbial smoking gun responsible for many hallmarks of human evolution such as brain expansion, cooperation, family formation, pair bonding, tool making, and even selection of marriage partners. Some alternative interpretations […]

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GI Symbol News with Dr Alan Barclay

Dr Alan Barclay New health claim legislation for Australia and New Zealand includes provisions for GI.  Food Standards Australia and New Zealand’s (FSANZ) draft food standard to regulate nutrition content claims and health claims on food labels and in advertisements was recently approved by the Legislative and Governance Forum on Food Regulation clearing the way […]

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GI Update with Prof Jennie Brand-Miller

Prof Jennie Brand-Miller answers your questions. I have heard it’s a good idea to go meatless one day a week. Why is that?  The beta cells of the pancreas, which make insulin, are under constant assault from our modern Western way of eating – it’s not just too many high-Gl carbs, it’s also too much […]

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